Services

Root Canal Therapy

At the center of every tooth is the pulp, a collection of connective tissue, blood vessels and nerves that helps to build the surrounding tooth. This pulp runs through a channel inside the root canal treatment is the procedure of removing this pulp tissue from an inflamed tooth.

 

The endodontist carefully cleans and shapes the inside of the canal, then fills and seals the space. Afterwards, you will return to your dentists, who will place a crown or other restoration on the tooth to protect and restore it to full function. After restoration, the tooth continues to function like any other tooth.

Root Canal Retreatment

Root canal retreatment is needed in patients where a tooth may not have healed as expected after initial treatment for many reasons that include but are not limited to:

 

  • Complicated canal anatomy went undetected in the first procedure.

  • The Placement of the permanent restoration was delayed following the endodontic treatment.

  • The restoration did not prevent salivary contamination to the inside of the tooth.

  • Narrow or curved canals were not treated during the initial procedure.

Cracked Teeth

A cracked tooth that hurts could cause pain for multiple reasons. Chewing can cause movement of the pieces, and the pulp can become irritated. Irritation of the dental pulp can be repeated many times by chewing. The tooth will not only hurt when chewing but may also become sensitive to temperature extremes.

 

There are many different types of cracked teeth. The treatment and outcome for your tooth depends on the type, location and severity of the crack in your tooth.

Apicoectomy (Endodontic Surgery)

(A procedure where the Endodontist opens up the gum tissue near the tooth to see underlying bone and remove any enflamed or infected tissue. The end of the root is also removed.)

An Apicoectomy is performed after an unsuccessful root canal has already been performed. There are many spaces within a tooth that may still contain infected tissue, so it can be difficult to ensure that all of the infection is removed during a root canal. During an Apicoectomy, the tip of the root is removed and replaced with a filling.

 

In most cases, a second root canal is considered before an Apicoectomy since it is a simpler, less invasive procedure. Before the start of an Apicoectomy, you will be given a local anesthetic to thoroughly numb the area. The doctor will start by making an incision in your gum to expose the root of your tooth. Any enflamed tissue will be removed to clean out the area. Only a few millimeters are removed from the root. For this reason, the doctor will use a high powered microscope and small precision instruments to perform the surgery. The precise nature of the surgery gives it a high rate of success. After the root is removed, a filling is placed in the root and the gums are sutured. Depending on the type of sutures, you may have to return in a few days to have them removed, or dissolving sutures may be used instead. Over the course of the next few months, the bone will heal around the root.

(A procedure where the Endodontist opens up the gum tissue near the tooth to see underlying bone and remove any enflamed or infected tissue. The end of the root is also removed.)

An Apicoectomy is performed after an unsuccessful root canal has already been performed. There are many spaces within a tooth that may still contain infected tissue, so it can be difficult to ensure that all of the infection is removed during a root canal. During an Apicoectomy, the tip of the root is removed and replaced with a filling.

 

In most cases, a second root canal is considered before an Apicoectomy since it is a simpler, less invasive procedure. Before the start of an Apicoectomy, you will be given a local anesthetic to thoroughly numb the area. The doctor will start by making an incision in your gum to expose the root of your tooth. Any enflamed tissue will be removed to clean out the area. Only a few millimeters are removed from the root. For this reason, the doctor will use a high powered microscope and small precision instruments to perform the surgery. The precise nature of the surgery gives it a high rate of success. After the root is removed, a filling is placed in the root and the gums are sutured. Depending on the type of sutures, you may have to return in a few days to have them removed, or dissolving sutures may be used instead. Over the course of the next few months, the bone will heal around the root.

Traumatic Dental Injuries

Whether the injury is the result of an auto accident, a sports mishap, an altercation, or a bad fall, the severity and type of injury will determine the treatment necessary.

 

Dislodged tooth

During an injury a tooth may be pushed into its socket. This can be one of the more serious injuries. We can reposition and stabalize your tooth, Root canal treatment is usually started within a couple of weeks of the injury, and a medication, such as calcium hydroxide, may be put inside the tooth. A permanent root canal filling will be placed at a later date.

CBCT Scanner Services

We are pleased to announce that we have installed a Cone Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT) scanner, Carestream 8100 3D, in our office. We are committed to the very best care for our patients. The ability to take three-dimensional images has proven to be an invaluable aid in both diagnosis and treatment. This technology allows us to identify cases to better assess and treat the complexities of both initial endodontic procedures and re-treatments. 

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Snyder Endodontics

32E East Roseville Road

Lancaster, PA 17601
snyderendodontics@gmail.com

Tel: 717-826-9959

Fax: 717-208-7826

 

 

© 2018 by Snyder Endodontics. Proudly created by Yessenia Diaz.

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